Tag Archives: Niklas Angmyr

Work-based performance model

A couple of months ago I published the post Work-based learning (based on work by Niklas Angmyr and Charles Jennings‘ “Re-thinking workplace learning“) and the time has now come to update the model presented and take it to the next level. In short the change can be attributed to:

Beneficial knowledge is nice to have but
beneficial behavior is what gets you results

competence-behavior

Let’s start at the top left. The classic L&D sector is the blue box of competence building activities. Here I’d suggest one would place activities described in the post Multi-Layer Learning, i.e. not only formal ones like classroom training but also informal stuff like communities, role-modeling and databases. And yes, by saying that the top blue box is the classic L&D sector I also say that L&D often doesn’t do anything else of what’s shown in the model above. This model is more applicable for a department working as a Knowledge and Performance Partner than that of a Learning and Development department.

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How L&D became masters of doing the wrong thing

In a comment to Niklas Angmyr’s post on the subject of learning, corporate learning and the article Making Corporate Learning work by Shlomo Ben-Hur and Nik Kenley, Niklas get one of the authors to comment, namely Nik Kenley, and a very interesting point is made:

Corporate learning has behavioral change as its main goal – not learning. The clinch is that the L&D departments across the globe DO have learning as its main goal – not behavioral change.

Why does this matter? It’s similar to leaving your car at the mechanic’s expecting a tune-up and getting it washed, because the mechanic didn’t have tune-up as her main goal but to get your car as good looking as possible. Not only will the car malfunction as before, but you’d probably still get charged for the washing you didn’t ask for.

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